Struggling to Learn Kanji? Use Imaginative—Not Visual—Memory

Struggling to Learn Kanji? Use Imaginative—Not Visual—Memory

Does this sound familiar? You stare at a given kanji (漢字・かんじ, “Chinese character”) for a few minutes, trying to will the strokes into memory. You write the kanji out a few dozen times, hoping the muscle memory and repetition will help it stick in your head. You move on to the next kanji, and repeat the same process. You flip the page over and try to write the first kanji again without looking at the model. What the heck! Where did it go!? At this point, most learners then blame themselves, assuming they simply “have a bad memory” or “aren’t studying hard enough.” The truth is that the problem lies not with your memory or motivation but with your method. Unless you have a photographic memory, this “visual memory” approach is simply not an effective way to learn highly complex information like kanji. So how should we learn then? The answer is “imaginative memory.” Read the article to see what it is and how to use it.

Top 10 Tools for Learning Japanese Through Online Videos

Top 10 Tools for Learning Japanese Through Online Videos

We have been conditioned by well-intentioned mothers to believe that television will “destroy our brains.” This might well be true if one spends their time watching “reality” TV shows that don’t actually reflect reality, the sensationalist 24-hour news cycle, and tasteless drivel that neither entertains nor educates. But if you watch television in Japanese, this otherwise time-wasting and brain-wasting activity can become a constructive form of language learning that even mommy should be able to get behind! Video is also one of the best ways to create a fun, effective, foreign language immersion environment no matter where in the world you happen to live. Here now are my top ten favorite tools for using online video to learn Japanese.

What is the Best Way to Learn Japanese Hiragana & Katakana?

What is the Best Way to Learn Japanese Hiragana & Katakana?

In this excerpt from my Master Japanese guide, I answer a number of frequently asked questions about why and how to learn Japanese kana. Even if you only want to learn to speak Japanese, I highly recommend investing the time to learn hiragana and katakana as they will help you improve your pronunciation and significantly expand the number of language resources available to you on your learning journey.

How to Apply the “Minimum Effective Dose” Approach to Learning Kanji

How to Apply the “Minimum Effective Dose” Approach to Learning Kanji

Question: What do boiling water and learning kanji have in common? Answer: Just as you only need a certain temperature to boil water, you only need to know a finite number of high-frequency kanji to read blogs, manga, books, magazines, newspapers, etc. This is the minimum effective dose (MED), a powerful tool to save you lots of time and effort in your Japanese language learning journey.

The Top 5 iPhone Apps for Learning Japanese

The Top 5 iPhone Apps for Learning Japanese

A search of the Apple App Store reveals an overwhelming number of Japanese language apps, but sadly (or perhaps, fortunately) the vast majority are not very useful. To save you time and help you focus on actually acquiring Japanese instead of wasting time searching for tools, I have tried dozens and dozens of apps over the years and have narrowed down my list to my five favorites.

Chad Fowler’s “Harajuku Moment”: How Honest Self-Reflection and a Strong Enough “Why” Create Lasting Motivation

Chad Fowler’s “Harajuku Moment”: How Honest Self-Reflection and a Strong Enough “Why” Create Lasting Motivation

To succeed in any long-term endeavor, may it be learning a language or transforming your body, you need to have a strong enough “why.” “I kinda want to learn Japanese” or “It would be nice to lose 20 pounds of body fat” won’t cut it. Your objective must be a “need,” not a “want.” This concept is illustrated beautifully in a section of The 4-Hour Body by Tim Ferriss titled “The Harajuku Moment.” Tim shares the inspring story of Chad Fowler―a CTO, programmer, author, and co-organizer of the RubyConf and RailsConf conferences―who lost over 70 pounds in less than a year! While his specific story is health related, you can apply the exact same wisdom to language learning.

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